New Art Exhibition Claims Killing Babies in Abortion is “Normal”

National   Micaiah Bilger   Jan 9, 2020   |   6:22PM    Washington, DC

A new art show opening Thursday in New York is pushing the notion that aborting an unborn baby is “normal.”

ARTnews reports Jasmine Wahi, an art curator and director of Project for Empty Space in Newark, New Jersey, launched the project with artist Marilyn Minter after Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed a law to ban abortions in May 2019.

“Let’s do something. I’m going bats— crazy,” Minter wrote to Wahi that day. She proposed an art exhibition dedicated to promoting abortion, or “reproductive justice” as they call it.

They named the exhibition “Abortion Is Normal” and recruited about 50 fellow artists to become involved, according to the report. It debuts Thursday in New York.

“Our sentiment is that abortion is part of health and reproductive justice, and anything having to do with reproductive justice has to do with body autonomy and body sovereignty,” Wahi told ARTnews. “Therefore any type of medical procedure—anything that affects one’s body—that is their choice to do should be normal.”

Wahi said people should see abortion as normal because “what you do with your body should be your choice and whatever that entails should be something that we consider normalized.”

Unsurprisingly, their project also is a fundraiser for the billion-dollar abortion chain Planned Parenthood. According to the report, all proceeds from the art sales will be divided between Downtown for Democracy and the Planned Parenthood PAC, both of which are backing pro-abortion candidates in the 2020 election.

Artists’ works in the exhibition include a “performance ephemera by Viva Ruiz/Thank God For Abortion” and “an installation of perfume bottles containing menstrual blood by Christen Clifford,” the report states.

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“I hope this is the beginning of a much larger dialogue,” Wahi said. “I hope that other people see what [we] believe in very strongly, which is how impactful art can be in shaping social cause and making a difference.”

Though Wahi said their goal is to present a “diversity of perspectives” on the matter, the exhibition has nothing to do with a rational discussion about abortion or even individuals’ very different experiences with it. For example, women who regret aborting their unborn babies and people who survived abortions do not appear to be represented in any way. Nor are siblings who suffer grief after learning a sister or brother was aborted.

The exhibit pushes a pro-abortion agenda, not a dialogue. It attempts to convince the public that killing another human being – one’s own offspring – is normal and good. It pushes the notion that a baby in the womb is disposable, worthless, instead of a unique, valuable human being who deserves a right to life.