New Analysis of 20 Studies Finds 151% Increased Breast Cancer Risk After Abortion

National   Angela Lanfranchi MD FACS   Jan 7, 2019   |   6:13PM    Washington, DC

In February 2017, the Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology published the “Epidemiology of breast cancer in Indian women.”

Malvia, et al. found that from 1982-2005, the incidence of breast cancer had almost doubled. Breast cancer is now the leading cause of cancer deaths in women in India. India’s burden of breast cancer is ever increasing and now impacting 1.5 million women a year.

Moreover women suffering from breast cancer were a decade younger than women in western countries. Most breast cancers in India occur in women in their 30s and 40s!

Link to abortion

In 2018, the Breast Cancer Prevention Institute funded and published “Induced Abortion as an Independent Risk Factor for Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Studies on South Asian Women” in Issues in Law and Medicine. (A meta-analysis looks at separate but similar studies in order to use the pooled data for statistical significance. It is regarded by scientists as very strong evidence.)

Of the 20 studies analyzed, 16 were done on Indian women. The meta-analysis found a 151% increased risk of breast cancer after an induced abortion.

In 2014, “Breast Cancer and Induced Abortion,” an analysis also published in Issues in Law and Medicine, revealed that the incidence of breast cancers increased 10-14 years after an abortion. This analysis was consistent with the known biology of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant increase in breast cancer risk before 10 years and after 14 years of an abortion.

Induced abortion in India, referred to as “Medical Termination of Pregnancy,” was legalized in 1971. Sons are most highly prized and sex selection abortions, although illegal, are not uncommon.

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A study published in the Lancet 2006 and based on conservative assumptions, reported that the practice of sex-selection accounts for about a half million missing female births yearly. Over the past two decades this translates into the abortion of some 10 million female fetuses.

Of the 20 studies, 16 were of Indian women. The meta-analysis found a 151% increased risk of breast cancer after an induced abortion.

In 2014, “Breast Cancer and Induced Abortion,” an analysis also published in Issues in Law and Medicine, revealed that the incidence of breast cancers increased 10-14 years after an abortion. This analysis was consistent with the known biology of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant increase in breast cancer risk before 10 years and after 14 years of an abortion.

According to UNICEF, 27% of Indian women marry by the age of 18. Breast cancer in these young women cuts to the heart of the family leaving young children without mothers and husbands without wives.

In addition to the tragic loss of female unborn babies, sex selection abortion leads to abnormal male/female ratios, resulting in a disordered society of men without a spouse and many other regrettable social outcomes.

We can only hope and pray that education and changes of heart will lead to better outcomes for both women and men.

LifeNews Note: Angela Lanfranchi, MD FACS, is President of the Breast Cancer Prevention Institute.