Woman Flying Home to Ireland to Vote Against Abortion Because the “Most Fundamental Human Right is Right to Life”

International   Micaiah Bilger   May 17, 2018   |   1:00PM    Dublin, Ireland

A young Irish woman plans to travel home from college early this year to vote in favor of rights for unborn babies.

Sarah Gillespie, 21, of Donegal, Ireland, attends college in Pennsylvania on a scholarship. Typically, Gillespie said she would travel home in June; but she is leaving early so that she can vote on May 25 to protect unborn babies’ rights, according to The Irish Sun.

“I believe we, as a whole, should always protect the most vulnerable in society in order for humanity to progress, and the most fundamental of human rights is the right to life,” Gillespie told The Sun.

While polling shows more support for abortion among young Irish voters, Gillespie represents a passionate group of young pro-lifers who are speaking out against abortion.

Like many young adults, Gillespie supported the gay marriage referendum in Ireland in 2015. She said she views both gay marriage and abortion as important human rights issues.

“I consider myself a feminist, and I believe in equality for everyone: female, male, people of different race, ethnicity, age, disability and, of course, the unborn child,” she said. “I am a proud citizen of Ireland and it means a lot for me to return home because right now, we protect the right to life – and that includes the life of the mother.”

She said Ireland is one of the safest countries in the world for mothers and babies because of its pro-life laws – a fact backed up by leading Irish doctors. Ireland has one of the lowest maternal mortality rates in the world.

“I am also passionately pro-woman. I want only the best for our women and our girls. But I believe that if the best ‘solution’ for a woman who finds herself in a crisis pregnancy is abortion, then we, as a society, have failed that woman,” she said.

JOIN THE CAMPAIGN! Pray for Ireland to Reject Abortion

“Women are stronger than abortion. We should be advocating for, funding and promoting better options for these women in difficult situations,” Gillespie continued. “I would certainly encourage anyone who even feels even just slightly against the proposed legislation to go out and vote no.”

On May 25, Ireland is scheduled to vote on whether to repeal its Eighth Amendment, which protects unborn babies’ right to life. Abortion activists, backed by some of the world’s richest men, are pushing the pro-life country to legalize abortion on demand.

Pro-lifers estimate that the Eighth Amendment has saved approximately 100,000 unborn babies’ lives from abortion.

If the amendment is repealed, government leaders plan to push a proposal to legalize abortion for any reason up to 12 weeks of pregnancy and up to six months in a wide range of circumstances.

Pro-life advocates have been working hard against a biased media, celebrities and huge, illegal donations from rich American businessmen who are intent on pushing Ireland to adopt abortion on demand. Pro-life volunteers have been knocking on doors across Ireland to save the Eighth Amendment and thousands of unborn babies’ lives.

On Thursday, a new Irish Times poll found the pro-abortion side rapidly is losing ground with voters. While support for the repeal still is higher than for the retention, polls no longer indicate an almost sure victory for abortion activists.