Newborn Baby Found Alive Abandoned in Trash Compactor, Woman Heard Cries as She Walked By

State   Conor Beck   Mar 29, 2016   |   6:04PM    Everett, Washington

There’s disturbing news out of Everett, Washington, today about a baby who was found buried under trash bags in a dumpster.

The Washington Post reports on a woman, Paula Andrews, hearing sounds coming out of a trash compactor from the apartment complex where she works as a maintenance supervisor.

Her boyfriend, Jeff Meyers, estimates that she went through about 20 garbage bags before she discovered the newborn child, according to the report.

“I can’t believe it’s a real baby. I can’t believe somebody had done this,” she said at the time.

Meyers continues: “I mean, thank God Paula didn’t hit that [trash compactor] button; I mean, had that baby not cried one second before she hit that button, we’d be out here for a much worse story.”

He tells the newspaper that the child was covered in blood and had the umbilical cord attached.

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Authorities are investigating the incident and trying to discover the baby boy’s mother. They are asking the public for any information that could help them understand the horrific discovery.

The news is especially unfortunate because of the state’s safe haven laws. Though Washington is a liberal state, it has a law that saves unborn babies, allowing new mothers “72 hours to leave a newborn baby at a fire station or emergency room with no questions asked — and no charges filed.” Safe haven laws have saved newborn babies before. In Colorado, a newborn girl was dropped off at a fire station and later adopted by a loving family, LifeNews reported.

Regarding his girlfriend’s discover of the newborn baby, Meyers says: “We feel it’s a miracle. It happened on Good Friday. I get emotional. I get emotional when I talk about it.”

The discovery brings to mind multiple reports of Planned Parenthood dumping aborted babies in landfills, showing that disregard for human life in this particular way is not just a local crime, but a common reality.