Oklahoma Abortion Activists Withdraw Amendment to Overturn State’s Abortion Ban

State   |   Steven Ertelt   |   Dec 9, 2022   |   11:25AM   |   Washington, DC

Abortion activists have withdrawn a statewide ballot amendment that would have overturned Oklahoma’s abortion ban. That means babies will continue to be protected from abortions in the Sooner State.

Oklahoma became one of many states to ban abortions following the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. It had the distinction of becoming the first in the nation to successfully ban abortions from conception when Governor Kevin Stitt signed its Texas-style abortion ban in May. But, with the Supreme Court reversing Roe, the state’s trigger ban has gone into effect — which successfully bans abortions without having to rely on a private enforcement mechanism. This will allow state and local officials to uphold the abortion ban and punish abortionists who defy it and kill babies.

Oklahoma Attorney General John O’Connor sent a letter to several state leaders certifying that a “trigger law” that reinstates an abortion ban from 1910. O’Connor said, “This is a huge day for Americans, and certainly those who believe life begins at conception.”

“The womb is now, in Oklahoma, the safest place for a child to be,” O’Connor said.

Not happy that women and unborn children would be protected, abortion advocates — playing off of victories in other states — proposed a constitutional amendment to make killing babies in abortions a right. But they have withdrawn it for lack of support.

Records show the proponents of the citizen-led initiative petition notified the Secretary of State’s office on Wednesday of their plans to withdraw.

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The group was led by Roger Coody, a hairstylist from Tulsa with no formal legal training who said he was hoping to protect the rights of women in his state. Messages left Thursday for Coody were not immediately returned.

Supporters of the petition would have had 90 days to gather more than 173,000 signatures from registered voters to qualify the question for the ballot.

If approved by voters, it would have enshrined the right to an abortion in the Oklahoma Constitution until fetal viability, which is approximately 24 weeks into a pregnancy, and invalidated any state laws that conflicted.

As LifeNews reported, the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, with a 6-3 majority ruling in the Dobbs case that “The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion” — allowing states to ban abortions and protect unborn babies. The high court also ruled 6-3 uphold the Mississippi 15-week abortion ban so states can further limit abortions and to get rid of the false viability standard.

Chief Justice John Roberts technically voted for the judgment but, in his concurring opinion, disagreed with the reasoning and said he wanted to keep abortions legal but with a new standard.

Texas and Oklahoma had banned abortions before Roe was overturned and Missouri became the first state after Roe to protect babies from abortions and South Dakota became the 2nd. Then Arkansas became the third state protecting babies from abortions and Kentucky became the 4th and Louisiana became the 5th and Ohio became the 6th and Utah became the 7th and Oklahoma became the 8th and Alabama became the 9th. This week, Mississippi became the 10th and South Carolina became the 11th,Texas became the 12th with its pre-Roe law and Tennessee became the 13th.

“Abortion presents a profound moral question. The Constitution does not prohibit the citizens of each State from regulating or prohibiting abortion. Roe and Casey arrogated that authority. We now overrule those decisions and return that authority to the people and their elected representatives,” Alito wrote.

“Roe was egregiously wrong from the start. Its reasoning was exceptionally weak, and the decision has had damaging consequences,” Alito wrote. “And far from bringing about a national settlement of the abortion issue, Roe and Casey have enflamed debate and deepened division.”

Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Stephen Breyer authored a joint dissent condemning the decision as enabling states to enact “draconian” restrictions on women.

Polls show Americans are pro-life on abortion and a new national poll shows 75% of Americans essentially agree with the Supreme Court overturning Roe.

Despite false reports that abortion bans would prevent doctors from treating pregnant women for miscarriages or ectopic pregnancies, pro-life doctors confirm that is not the case. Some 35 states have laws making it clear that miscarriage is not abortion and every state with an abortion ban allows treatment for both.