Andrew Cuomo: “I’ve Never Done Anything in My Public Career That I’ve Been Ashamed Of”

National   Micaiah Bilger   Mar 3, 2021   |   4:26PM    Albany, New York

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo refused to apologize Wednesday after he was accused of covering up the deaths of thousands of people in nursing homes due to COVID-19 and sexually harassing several women.

Facing calls to resign, the Democrat governor said he will not step down, and he is not ashamed of anything that he has done. Cuomo also caused international outrage in 2019 after he signed a law to expand late-term abortions and then ordered that the World Trade Center be lit pink to celebrate.

“I do not believe I have ever done anything in my public career that I am ashamed of,” Cuomo said at a press conference Wednesday. Addressing the sexual abuse allegations, he added: “I didn’t know I was making her uncomfortable at the time. I feel badly that I did, and I’m going to learn from it.”

Asked if he will resign, Cuomo said no, the Daily Caller reports.

“Some politicians will always play politics … I don’t think today is the day for politics,” he responded. “I wasn’t elected by politicians. I was elected by the people of the state of New York. I’m not going to resign.”

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For months, LifeNews and other conservative news outlets have been reporting on Cuomo’s disastrous nursing home policy, which forced nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients. The order put coronavirus patients together with the elderly and people with disabilities, those most vulnerable to the virus. The governor later reversed the policy but not before thousands died.

In January, New York Attorney General Letitia James, a Democrat, released a report accusing Cuomo and his administration of covering up approximately 4,000 individuals’ deaths in nursing homes to COVID-19.

A few days later, Cuomo top aid Melissa DeRosa told state Democrat lawmakers that the administration withheld the actual death numbers because they were worried the information would “be used against us” politically.

In recent weeks, the sexual abuse allegations against Cuomo have dominated mainstream news reports, more so than the nursing home scandal. Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro suggested there is a reason for this.

“It is so perfectly transparent that the new attempt to bowl over Cuomo over the sexual harassment stuff is a pure misdirect from the fact that he should be tossed (and perhaps prosecuted) for his covid policy and coverup,” Shapiro wrote on Twitter. “It also allows them to sidestep that they were dead wrong on covid policy, and dishonest to boot.”

It also may be to save themselves from embarrassment. Traditional news outlets, including Cuomo’s own brother, CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, fawned over the New York governor’s handling of the coronavirus for months. The New York governor wrote a book about it and even received an Emmy Award for his “leadership” during the pandemic.

Janice Dean, a Fox News meteorologist whose in-laws died in New York nursing homes, has been leading New Yorkers in demanding accountability from Cuomo.

“He still hasn’t apologized to 15,000 families,” Dean responded after Cuomo’s press conference.

In March 2020, Cuomo began requiring nursing homes to accept COVID-positive patients – an action that placed potentially contagious people together with those most vulnerable to the virus. He later reversed the policy, but thousands of people died.

Originally, New York reported 8,110 deaths at nursing homes due to the coronavirus. However, the state tally only included people who died at a facility. Nursing home residents who were transferred to hospitals and died there were not included in the total.

According to the attorney general’s report in January, the actual total was 12,743 deaths in nursing homes.

After the report broke, a state Democrat lawmaker, Assemblyman Ron Kim, D-Queens, said Cuomo called him at home and threatened him after he accused the governor of covering up the death total.

New York has one of the highest COVID-19 death numbers and death rates in the United States – a status it has maintained for months, according to coronavirus statistics updated daily at NBC News.

Four other Democrat governors also ordered nursing homes to take coronavirus patients in 2020 before reversing their orders: New Jersey, California, Pennsylvania and Michigan. Some of them now are facing investigations as well. These states are among the top ten for the highest coronavirus deaths in the country.