Abortion Activist Kamala Harris Says Story of the “Good Samaritan” Influences Her Politics

National   Micaiah Bilger   Jun 18, 2019   |   5:42PM    Washington, DC

Sen. Kamala Harris is one of the most avid abortion activists of all the Democrats running for president in 2020.

She prosecuted David Daleiden for exposing Planned Parenthood’s trafficking of aborted baby body parts, and hired former Planned Parenthood CEO Cecile Richards’ daughter on her staff. She supports unrestricted abortions up to birth and wants to force taxpayers to pay for them.

But on Monday, the California senator said her political views are influenced strongly by Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan and his question “Who is my neighbor?”, according to the Christian Post.

“Neighbor is about understanding and living in service of others and understanding that we are all each other’s brothers and sisters,” Harris told the Moral Action Congress hosted by The Poor People’s Campaign. “Seeing in each other a family member, a child, a friend, a mother, a father.”

To Harris, though, children who are not yet born – and even some who are – are not members of the family. Earlier this year, she voted against a bill to protect newborn babies who survive abortions from infanticide.

On Monday, Harris argued that her political positions come from a position of morality.

“This is about morality, it is about what are our morals,” she said during the candidates’ forum at Trinity Washington University. “It is about what is right, what are the teachings of Christ and other leaders who teach us the importance of living a life that is not about ourselves but about service to and for others.”

Harris said Jesus’ parable inspires her, just as her parents’ work in the Civil Rights Movement did.

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“I often think of the parable of the Good Samaritan because what the teachings are there from the book of Luke, it is about how do we define neighbor,” Harris said.

“Everyone knows [we need to] live and treat our neighbor as we would want to be treated. But what I like about the parable of the Good Samaritan is that it’s about defining who is neighbor and understanding that neighbor is not about the person who shares your zip code,” she continued.

“What we learn in that parable is that neighbor is that person you are walking by who is homeless on the street. The neighbor is some child or young person who is a runaway and who is vulnerable or has been exposed to neglect or abuse,” Harris said.

Because of Jesus’ teachings, she said she supports Medicare for All. The proposed health care plan would force taxpayers to fund the killing of unborn babies and prohibit states from defunding Planned Parenthood, the billion-dollar abortion provider.

Harris said she supports these policies because they help people in need. From her earliest years, she said her family stressed that she should center her life around “service to others.”

“We need to see what is happening in our country and treat our fellow human beings as we would our neighbor, as we would want for ourselves,” she said.

The problem is that Harris discriminates about who she sees as a “neighbor” and a “fellow human being.” Babies in the womb are aborted at a rate of nearly 1 million a year in America, and, biologically, they are unique, living human beings from the moment of conception. But to Harris and her fellow Democratic presidential candidates, these babies do not deserve any protections from violence, discrimination or death under the law.