Virginia Gov Ralph Northam Defends Defending Infanticide: Only Talking About Infanticide of Disabled Babies

State   Steven Ertelt   Jan 30, 2019   |   5:43PM    Washington, DC

A spokesman for Virginia Governor Ralph Northam defended the governor’s comments today defending infanticide. The governor’s spokesman essentially said the governor was only talking about infanticide in cases of disabled babies.

Northam not only has defended a new bill in the state legislature that would legalize abortions up to birth – even if the mother is dilated — he defended infanticide during a radio show today.

Northam apparently thinks it’s okay to kill a baby once the infant is fully delivered.

“If a mother is in labor…the infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable. The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and mother,” he said.

A newly-issued official statement on behalf of the governor essentially doubles down on the initial comments defending infanticide. The comments do not address them main issue that caused the outcry in the first place, namely supporting the discussion that a mother would have with doctors about whether or not to leave an infant to die instead of providing appropriate medical care.

Ofirah Yheskel, Northam’s communications director, issued a statement looking to clarify the governor’s comments.

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“The governor’s comments were limited to the actions physicians would take in the event that a woman [facing nonviable pregnancy or severe fetal abnormalities] went into labor,” it said.

“Republicans in Virginia and across the country are trying to play politics with women’s health, and that is exactly why these decisions belong between a woman and her physician, not legislators, most of whom are men,” the statement reads. “No woman seeks a third trimester abortion except in the case of tragic or difficult circumstances, such as a nonviable pregnancy or in the event of severe fetal abnormalities, and the governor’s comments were limited to the actions physicians would take in the event that a woman in those circumstances went into labor.”

Yheskel added: “Attempts to extrapolate these comments otherwise is in bad faith and underscores exactly why the governor believes physicians and women, not legislators, should make these difficult and deeply personal medical decisions.”