Cecile Richards Recalls Obama Forcing Christians to Fund Abortions: “No Sweeter Day in My Lifetime”

National   Micaiah Bilger   Oct 25, 2018   |   4:59PM    Washington, DC

Abortion activist Cecile Richards told a women’s group that one of her “sweetest” moments in life was working with President Barack Obama on the oppressive Obamacare HHS mandate.

Richards, who made a nearly $1 million salary running the abortion “nonprofit” Planned Parenthood, spoke Oct. 11 to the National Council of Jewish Women’s annual Women of Vision in Michigan.

The Jewish News reports she urged women to vote for liberal candidates, and spoke about her proudest moments working for Planned Parenthood, which aborts about 320,000 unborn babies every year in America.

“Marching is great, knitting ‘pussy’ hats, calling senators, sending postcards, those are all great, but voting is the whole deal,” Richards said, pushing pro-abortion liberals to vote in the November midterms. “Every bit of progress we’ve made is on the line.”

During her 12 years at the abortion giant, Richards made numerous trips to the White House to visit pro-abortion President Obama and work with him on the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. That work is what she is the most proud of, she told the group.

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According to the report:

Richards regards her work on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as her signature achievement.

“There was no sweeter day in my entire lifetime,” she said, than the day President Obama called her to tell her the ACA would include no-cost birth control.

“It’s hard to overstate how dramatic this change was,” she said. “For the first time, women had access to no-cost, effective birth control as well as to preventive care.”

But it was that same HHS mandate that forced religious charities and business owners to go to court or face crippling fines for refusing to violate their beliefs. The mandate forces employers to cover numerous forms of birth control, including types that may cause abortions, with virtually no moral or religious exemptions.

Because of Richards’ work, Hobby Lobby, Little Sisters of the Poor and other employers were forced fight all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court for their religious freedom. Fortunately, the high court did provide them relief.

But the reality of Richards’ “sweetest moment” is that her work threatened the lives and livelihoods of millions of Americans, born and unborn.