98% of Pregnant Women Infected With Zika Give Birth to a Healthy Baby, Abortion’s Unnecessary

National   Micaiah Bilger   Aug 31, 2016   |   9:31AM    Washington, DC

Right now in the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control knows of almost 600 women who are pregnant and have the Zika virus. Many of them are facing increasing pressure to abort their unborn babies because of a link between the virus and birth defects.

Abortion advocates have been using the virus and the link to birth defects as an excuse to push for more abortions on babies with disabilities. Some pro-abortion groups in South America even have been scaring women into aborting their unborn babies without knowing if they have Zika or if their unborn baby has a disability.

However, the risk of birth defects is not as great as many appear to believe.

One leading pro-life OB-GYN told World Magazine’s Evan Wilt:

“There is a lot of misunderstanding and unnecessary fear about the Zika virus,” said Donna Harrison, executive director of the American Association of Pro-life Obstetricians and Gynecologists. “And, unfortunately, those fears are motivated by politics.”

… Harrison, a board-certified OB-GYN, told me there are real fears associated with Zika, but pro-abortion groups are overhyping the threat.

For a woman to give birth to a baby with microcephaly, Zika infection needs to take place within the first trimester in most cases. Of those women, only 1-2 percent will see birth defects in their babies.

“That means 98 percent of pregnant women infected with the Zika virus will give birth to normal babies,” Harrison said.

She added nonpregnant women who get sick with Zika develop an immunity to the virus.

Research into the virus and the link to birth defects is on-going. Though many mainstream media reports gloss over the research showing a low risk of birth defects, several have confirmed Harrison’s report. The Associated Press previously reported on various research estimating between 1 percent and 15 percent of pregnant women who contracted Zika in the first trimester had babies with birth defects.

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Scientists also are working to develop a vaccine for Zika. In Mexico, university researchers also recently developed a 3D printed valve to help treat unborn babies who develop microcephaly, one of the birth defects linked to the virus.

However, some research efforts in the U.S. have been blocked by Planned Parenthood supporters in the U.S. House and Senate. The pro-abortion legislators have been blocking an aid bill for Zika prevention and research because it does not give money to a few Planned Parenthood facilities in Puerto Rico.

The abortion giant Planned Parenthood has been heavily involved in Zika-related politics in the U.S. Currently, Planned Parenthood is sending staffers to knock on women’s doors in Miami, Florida to talk about the Zika virus, according to the Miami Herald. They also are giving pregnant women “Zika kits” and informational fliers.

In April, a Planned Parenthood activist said women who are pregnant and contract the virus ought to be able to abort their potentially disabled babies. The abortion activists called killing such babies a “human right.”

Families of children with microcephaly have been speaking out against the eugenic abortion push. A Florida mother of two children with microcephaly told WPBF 25 News that her children have mental and physical disabilities, but they continue to amaze her every day.

Haneefa De Clercq said she hopes her family’s story will help others to recognize the value of children who have disabilities.

“That’s what I want those mothers to know, that it’s not the end of the world because you have these kids,” the Florida mother said. “They will teach them so much. They’ll teach them how to love, they will teach them patience. Everything is in God’s time, and if we have the patience to go through that, the rewards are so much greater, and my kids are the greatest gift. They’re the greatest gift God has ever given me.”

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