These Wendy Davis Supporters Can’t Name a Single Legislative Accomplishment

State   Steven Ertelt   Jul 2, 2014   |   12:23PM    Washington, DC

There is a reason some pro-life people have taken to calling Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis the “Abortion Barbie.” That’s because outside of her infamous filibuster against a bill that would ban late-term abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy on babies who can feel pain, Davis has no real record of legislative accomplishment.

Here’s a new video asking some of her hardcore supporters to name even one thing Davis has done while serving in the Texas legislature before deciding to run for governor. They’re stumped.

One pro-life writer says Wendy Davis’ campaign is fading a year after the infamous filibuster precisely because she has nothing to write home about other than promoting abortion.

wendydavis23What a difference 12 months can make! Just ask Wendy Davis, the Texas state senator who was cheered on by the “mainstream media” for conducting a “passionate” filibuster against a bill to restrict abortions in the Lone Star State. While the law eventually passed, the obscure official was instantly catapulted into the national spotlight and encouraged to run for governor in the 2014 election.

One year later, the Democratic candidate’s campaign is losing momentum despite the fact that she recently celebrated the anniversary of her attention-grabbing tactic by wearing her “comfortable pink sneakers” at a rally that led Manny Fernandez of the New York Times to declare: “For Wendy Davis, a filibuster goes only so far in the race to be governor of Texas.”

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“Recent polls have shown her trailing her Republican opponent — the state attorney general, Greg Abbott — by up to 12 percentage points,” Fernandez stated. “Her campaign manager, Karin Johanson — who helped engineer the Democratic takeover of Congress in 2006” — joined a number of aides and consultants who have left the team at various points of the campaign.

Nevertheless, “Davis has turned her filibuster on the floor of the Texas Senate into a grass-roots movement that has inspired thousands of volunteers, donors and other supporters to pledge their time and money to her on a scale few Texas Democrats have ever pulled off,” the reporter declared. “She has so far raised nearly $20 million.”

But “she’s not doing as well as people had hoped, expected or wanted,” said Bill Miller, an Austin lobbyist who works with both Democrats and Republicans and is a friend of the 51-year-old female candidate. He blames “unrealistic expectations” for the unexpected struggles in the campaign.