You Won’t Believe How a Deaf Woman Reacts When She Hears for the First Time

International   Steven Ertelt   Mar 28, 2014   |   8:55AM    Washington, DC

The pro-life movement focuses on the issue of abortion but as pro-life people we celebrate life. The pro-life is also concerned about the plight of the disabled — because their lives are often threatened by doctors, governments or a society that thinks somehow their disability makes their life less valuable.

A new video is out that is making the rounds of the Internet today that is a beautiful celebration of life.

A young woman who has been deaf for her entire life is shown as she hears sounds for the first time. The beauty of her reaction is priceless.

From a report about the video:

deaffrombirthAfter a lifetime of silence, a British woman can finally hear.

A video captured the moment 39-year-old Joanne Milne’s cochlear implants were switched on, allowing sounds to flood unchecked into her brain for the very first time.

Tears start falling down the woman’s shocked face as she realizes how much her life is going to change.

“Hearing things for the first time is so, so emotional, from the ping of a light switch to running water. I can’t stop crying,” Milne told The Independent.

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Milne was born with Usher syndrome, a condition that left her deaf since birth and blind since her mid-20s. But she was recently fitted with cochlear implants at the University Hospital Birmingham. The electronic device bypasses damaged portions of the ear to directly stimulate the auditory nerve, according to the National Institutes of Health. The sounds that are communicated to the ear aren’t as clear as those that provided by natural hearing. But it helps give a deaf person the ability to understand speech and a sense of the sounds in the environment.

It’s enough for Milne.

“The switch-on was the most emotional and overwhelming experience of my life and I’m still in shock now. The first day everybody sounded robotic and I have to learn to recognise what these sounds are as I build a sound library in my brain,” she told The Journal.