Harry Reid Claims He’s “Open” to Vote on Late-Term Abortion Ban

National   Steven Ertelt   Jul 15, 2013   |   1:36PM    Washington, DC

Harry Reid, the pro-abortion Democratic Leader in the Senate, says he is open to a vote on the late-term abortion ban the U.S. House approved that bans abortions after 20 weeks.

The vote for the bill broke down on mostly partisan lines with Republicans supporting the ban on late-term abortions and Democrats opposing it. The House approved the bill on a 228-196 vote with 6 Democrats voting for the bill and 6 Republicans voting against it.

Now the question is whether Reid will allow a up or down vote on the measure in the Senate — or whether Republicans will have any success in forcing the Senate to vote on the bill by attempting to attach it to other legislation as an amendment.

Reid told a television program yesterday that he’s “happy to take a look” at the ban.

Reid, who has called himself “pro-life,” said Sunday that he was open to allowing a Senate vote on the measure, though he added that it should not be the chamber’s primary focus.

“I think we should deal with the problems that affect this country,” Reid said during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “We need to do something to help the American working class and stop worrying about fringe issues.”

During the interview, Reid refused to answer David Gregory’s question as to whether or not it is reasonable to limit late-term abortion and called it a “fringe issue.”

Today, the national pro-life group Susan B. Anthony List (SBA List) called on Senator Reid and his fellow democrats to acknowledge widespread support for banning abortion past twenty weeks gestation and to allow this issue to be considered in the U.S. Senate.

“Opposition to late-term abortion is not a ‘fringe issue,’ as Leader Reid would like the media to report. He and his fellow Democrats are living outside of reality if they think this issue does not matter to the American people,” said SBA List President Marjorie Dannenfelser.

She told LifeNews: “Reid, who claims to be pro-life, should make good on his willingness to consider this issue. Poll after poll has revealed great consensus on the issue of protecting babies and women late in pregnancy. If he and his Senate colleagues stand with the American people in protecting women and five month old babies from the brutality of late-term abortion, they have nothing to fear from a Senate vote. Conversely, remaining silent on this – especially in the aftermath of Kermit Gosnell and other abortion clinic horrors – would be both a moral and political mistake.”

Rep. Trent Franks, the Arizona Republican, is hopeful but realistic about the slim chances of a Senate vote.

“If Harry Reid somehow had an open moment and he just looked at the situation for what it was . . . and you know, stranger things have happened,” he muses.

“Once in a while, a person finds his humanity in a way that astounds his contemporaries,” Franks adds. “And if it did happen, I think a vote on the floor of the U.S. Senate today would be very close. This might actually pass.”

Should the Senate somehow vote on the 20-week abortion ban and pass it, Franks knows pro-abortion President Barack Obama will make good on his veto threat.

“Mr. Obama would probably veto the bill, just like Mr. Clinton vetoed the partial-birth-abortion bill,” he told National Review. “Of course when the presidency changed, that was one of the first things signed.”

Leading pro-life groups are also challenging the Senate to take up the bill.

Family Research Council president Tony Perkins said, “We call on the Senate to update legal protection for pain-capable children and pass this legislation to stop future Gosnells. Americans overwhelmingly support restrictions to late abortion and we urge the Senate to ignore the president’s advisors and pass the House bill.”

Added Marjorie Dannenfelser, President of the SBA List: “This pro-woman, pro-science, Constitutional bill deserves an immediate vote in the U.S. Senate. It’s simple: children capable of experiencing unimaginable pain from abortion must be protected across the country.”

“Now the members of the U.S. Senate should stand with the women of America protect women and unborn, infant children, from dangerous, later-term procedures,” said American United for Life’s Charmaine Yoest.

A recent national poll by The Polling Company found that, after being informed that there is scientific evidence that unborn children are capable of feeling pain at least by 20 weeks, 64% would support a law banning abortion after 20 weeks, unless the mother’s life was in danger.   Only 30% said they would oppose such a law.

During the hearing, former abortion practitioner Anthony Levatino told members of the committee the gruesome details of his former abortion practice and how he became pro-life following the tragic automobile accident of his child.

Another bombshell dropped during the hearing came from Dr. Maureen Condic, who is Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She testified that the unborn child is capable of reacting to pain as early as 8-10 weeks. This is when most abortions in America take place.

The committee also saw graphic pictures of babies who were killed by Douglas Karpen, who is considered the second Kermit Gosnell.

The late-term abortion ban would allow abortion after 20 weeks post-fertilization if the mother’s life is endangered, or in cases of rape and incest reported prior to the abortion to appropriate authorities.

H.R. 1797 contains congressional findings of fact regarding the medical evidence that unborn children experience pain at least by 20 weeks “post-fertilization age,” or the start of the sixth month.

CLICK LIKE IF YOU’RE PRO-LIFE!

 

The bill relies on the science of fetal pain to establish a Constitutional reason for Congress to ban abortions late in pregnancy. The science behind the concept of fetal pain is fully established and Dr. Steven Zielinski, an internal medicine physician from Oregon, is one of the leading researchers into it. He first published reports in the 1980s to validate research showing evidence for it.

He has testified before Congress that an unborn child could feel pain at “eight-and-a-half weeks and possibly earlier” and that a baby before birth “under the right circumstances, is capable of crying.”

He and his colleagues Dr. Vincent J. Collins and Thomas J. Marzen  were the top researchers to point to fetal pain decades ago. Collins, before his death, was Professor of Anesthesiology at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois and author of Principles of Anesthesiology, one of the leading medical texts on the control of pain.

“The functioning neurological structures necessary to suffer pain are developed early in a child’s development in the womb,” they wrote.

“Functioning neurological structures necessary for pain sensation are in place as early as 8 weeks, but certainly by 13 1/2 weeks of gestation. Sensory nerves, including nociceptors, reach the skin of the fetus before the 9th week of gestation. The first detectable brain activity occurs in the thalamus between the 8th and 10th weeks. The movement of electrical impulses through the neural fibers and spinal column takes place between 8 and 9 weeks gestation. By 13 1/2 weeks, the entire sensory nervous system functions as a whole in all parts of the body,” they continued.

With Zielinski and his colleagues the first to provide the scientific basis for the concept of fetal pain, Dr. Kanwaljeet Anand of the University of Arkansas Medical Center has provided further research to substantiate their work.

“The neural pathways are present for pain to be experienced quite early by unborn babies,” explains Steven Calvin, M.D., perinatologist, chair of the Program in Human Rights Medicine, University of Minnesota, where he teaches obstetrics.

Dr. Colleen A. Malloy, Assistant Professor, Division of Neonatology at Northwestern University in her testimony before the House Judiciary Committee in May 2012 said, “[w]hen we speak of infants at 22 weeks LMP [Note: this is 20 weeks post fertilization], for example, we no longer have to rely solely on inferences or ultrasound imagery, because such premature patients are kicking, moving, reacting, and developing right before our eyes in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.”

“In today’s medical arena, we resuscitate patients at this age and are able to witness their ex-utero growth and development. Medical advancement and technology have enabled us to improve our ability to care for these infants…In fact, standard of care for neonatal intensive care units requires attention to and treatment of neonatal pain,” Dr. Malloy testified. She continued, “[t]hus, the difference between fetal and neonatal pain is simply the locale in which the pain occurs. The receiver’s experience of the pain is the same. I could never imagine subjecting my tiny patients to horrific procedures such as those that involve limb detachment or cardiac injection.”