Activists Push Abortion in UN Documents, Train Women to Self-Abort

International   Steven Ertelt   Jun 17, 2011   |   1:39PM    Washington, DC

Wendy Wright, the president of Concerned Women for America, writes in a new Washington Times opinion column that pro-abortion activists are continuing their efforts to push for abortion in documents ratified and supported by the United Nations.

In addition, one organization, the International Women’s Health Coalition, is training women how to do abortions on themselves — a dangerous concept that completely undermines the supposed pro-choice argument that abortions need to be legal so women don’t engage in self-abortions that place their lives at risk.

Below is the beginning of the column, which can be found at the Washington Times.

 

The International Women’s Health Coalition (IWHC) tells women how to perform abortions on themselves. It trains activists to pressure governments – with admittedly misleading information – to overturn pro-life laws.

Its president was chosen to be on a U.S. delegation to the United Nations‘ 2011 Commission on Population and Development. Delegates negotiated issues such as “reproductive rights” and government funding for groups that work on reproductive issues.

The IWHC claims to work on issues that empower women, yet its narrow realm of interest is sex and abortion. Real problems, such as HIV/AIDS and violence against women, become vehicles to push “sexual and reproductive justice.”

Also attending this little-noticed U.N. conference were abortion groups, including the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), which stand to benefit politically and financially. How much they receive depends on the outcome of negotiations.

The U.N.’s structure and immense funding are tempting for radical ideologues. The organization is a means to impose their views on the world and steer money to their cause without the mess of gaining public support and going through the democratic process.

Their game plan is: 1) Get their cause or a code phrase mentioned in a U.N. document; 2) claim this creates a “universal right”; 3) have activists work inside countries to convince unsuspecting (or colluding) officials that they are obligated to enforce this fabricated “right.”

Groups like the IWHC and IPPF apply top-down and bottom-up approaches, working with fellow ideologues on international documents and training activists to challenge laws on abortion or sex-related crimes.

For example, the IPPF insists that people with HIV/AIDS have a right not to disclose this to their partner. Its sex guide, “Healthy, Happy and Hot,” declares, “Some countries have laws that say people living with HIV must tell their sexual partner(s) about their status before having sex, even if they use condoms or only engage in sexual activity with a low risk of giving HIV to someone else. These laws violate the rights of people living with HIV by forcing them to disclose or face the possibility of criminal charges.”

The IWHC offers a how-to guide on self-abortions. It claims the method is “safe” yet, conflictingly, advises going to the hospital once the drug starts working in late pregnancies and when a woman experiences complications. It also describes how to hide evidence of the drug from medical personnel. In countries without access to penicillin or a hospital, such misguided advice puts women in grave risk.