Ted Williams’ Voice Reminds Us Abortion Silences Other Voices

Opinion   Maria Vitale   Jan 6, 2011   |   1:11PM    Columbus, OH

You can just imagine a Hollywood blockbuster, with actor Will Smith in the lead, chronicling the improbable tale of Ted Williams, a radio guy turned homeless man who becomes famous beyond his wildest dreams.

Williams was discovered recently near a highway ramp in Columbus, Ohio, holding a sign advertising his “God-given gift of voice,” as he begged for money along the road. He’s been listing his address as the streets of Columbus, but that promises to change, thanks to job offers galore after a video of him went viral. The Associated Press calls him an “online video sensation.” He could become a voice for the NBA’s Cleveland Cavaliers and the NFL as well.

The irony is that, looking at the man, with his homemade sign and his beggar’s demeanor, you would never know that he had been blessed with an incredible talent—a voice tailor-made for radio.

Williams reportedly fell on hard times after being caught in the web of drug addiction. According to the AP, he has served time for theft and forgery and has been arrested numerous times.

Yet, Williams has an incredible gift, and, now that that gift has been shared with the world, the world appears ready to give him a second chance.

I think the tale of Ted Williams is more than just a feel-good story. It is a story of redemption and grace, and it keenly demonstrates what the culture of life is all about.

For every life matters.  Every life has purpose and value. And every human being has something to contribute to the universe.

It is obvious that Williams’ voice is a gift from above—a gift bestowed upon him by a loving Creator, who fashioned him in his mother’s womb.

We know that about 1.2 million voices are silenced each year by abortion—and that the mothers of those little ones are often forced to grieve in silence. Each of those children had potential—each had a unique role to play in the drama of life.

On the flip side of life, the pro-euthanasia movement would have us believe that there are voices that should be silenced because they have outlived their usefulness. And yet, one never knows when a miraculous cure could occur—when an incredible turnaround could take place. If a homeless man can find international stardom, isn’t it possible that a person depressed enough to consider assisted suicide could discover a new reason to live, a sudden burst of hope?

Every person has inherent dignity—even the disheveled guy begging for change on the side of the road. Every life should be protected, because it is a gift—not only for that individual, but for us all. And that’s a story that deserves a Hollywood movie.  

LifeNews.com Note: Maria Vitale is an opinion columnist for LifeNews.com. She is the Public Relations Director for the Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation and Vitale has written and reported for various broadcast and print media outlets, including National Public Radio, CBS Radio, and AP Radio.