Idaho Senate Approves Informed Consent Measure on Abortion Helping Women

State   |   Steven Ertelt   |   Apr 6, 2006   |   9:00AM   |   WASHINGTON, DC

Idaho Senate Approves Informed Consent Measure on Abortion Helping Women Email this article
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by Steven Ertelt
LifeNews.com Editor
April 6, 2006

Boise, ID (LifeNews.com) — The Idaho state Senate on Wednesday approved an informed consent measure to help women obtain more information about abortion’s risks and alternatives that may not normally receive from the abortion facility beforehand. The Senate approved the bill on a 30 to 5 vote.

The measure now heads to the House for consideration.

The information would also tell women about psychological and emotional problems many women experience after an abortion and would also include fetal development photos to show the growth of the baby before birth.

The law requires abortion practitioners to give the women the information 24 hours prior to doing the abortion.

Those who violate the law would be fined $100 for every month they continue to do abortions without informing women of the risks and options.

A 1983 version of the law was ultimately declared unconstitutional but the state attorney general’s office has signed off on this bill as meeting requirements, according to Senator Hal Bunderson, a Republican who is sponsoring the measure.

The bill actually changes the 1983 law to allow the information to not be given in cases of medical emergencies — a provision not included originally that made the law unconstitutional.

The Idaho attorney general office determined the law wouldn’t stand up in court without the change, based on Supreme Court rulings. Deputy Attorney General William von Tagen approved of the bill, saying it would remedy the problem.

The Senate State Affairs Committee approved the change unanimously and pro-life groups say they support the measure.

“Regardless of the supposed normalcy of abortion, it continues to pose physical and emotional risks,” Julie Lynde, of Cornerstone Institute of Idaho, told AP.