Politician Defends Killing Babies in Late-Term Abortions Just Because They Have Down Syndrome

International   Micaiah Bilger   Feb 2, 2018   |   12:08PM    Dublin, Ireland

Satisfied with nothing less than abortion on demand, Irish abortion activists are pushing the public to legalize late-term abortions for unborn babies with Down syndrome.

Health Minister Simon Harris recently was presented with new data showing that 83 women traveled from Ireland to England to abort unborn babies with Down syndrome after 24 weeks of pregnancy in a two-year period, the Irish Independent reports.

Harris responded by saying he believes those 83 women were “not doing it lightly” when they aborted their viable unborn babies. However, he said an unborn baby’s disability should not be grounds for an abortion in Ireland.

Ireland protects unborn babies from the moment of conception, but its pro-life Eighth Amendment is under attack. Politicians are discussing a 12-week abortion law to replace the pro-life amendment; but abortion activists are using cases of unborn babies with disabilities to urge politicians to legalize abortions up until birth.

Here’s more from the report:

Mr Harris also said he accepted his “colleague and friend” Simon Coveney supported repeal of the Eighth Amendment but cannot back 12 weeks’ unrestricted access to abortion. “You know what? That’s OK. That’s his decision,” he said.

Earlier this week, the Health Minister said it was “offensive to suggest women in Ireland are seeking abortions on the grounds their babies will be born with disabilities like Down syndrome”. Asked yesterday if he was shocked at the figure of 83 such abortions, he said: “I am not shocked by it at all.”

It was wrong for others to put themselves in the shoes of a woman who has an abortion and pretend to know what is going on in her life or her mind and heart, he said.

“I acknowledge that 3,265 women travelled for an abortion in Britain from every county in Ireland in 2016,” he added.

If Ireland only legalizes abortions up to 12 weeks of pregnancy, women will not have the option to abort unborn babies who have disabilities, the pro-abortion movement argues. Typically, disabilities are not detected until about 20 weeks of pregnancy.

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Harris noted that it is “grossly offensive” that children with Down syndrome are being pushed into the debate.

He also said the discussion is just “hypothetical” at this point because Irish voters have not even decided if they want to repeal the Eighth Amendment. A referendum vote is scheduled for May.

Ireland is under intense pressure to repeal its Eighth Amendment, which protects unborn babies’ right to life. Abortion activists, backed by some of the world’s richest men, have been pushing the pro-life country to legalize abortion on demand for years.

SPUC reports the Oireachtas Committee recommended legislation that allows abortion up to 12 weeks for any reason, and past 12 weeks if the baby is diagnosed with a terminal condition or if the mother’s health is jeopardized.

Harris, the main author of the legislation, attempted to direct the discussion away from babies with non-fatal disabilities earlier this week, according to The Times. Harris said he considered it out of the question that the state would allow abortions simply for non-fatal disabilities.

This deadly discrimination against babies with disabilities is a problem across the world. Iceland has a nearly 100-percent abortion rate for babies with Down syndrome.

In 2014, the Danish government reported 98 percent of unborn babies who tested positive for Down syndrome were aborted. CBS reports the rate in France was 77 percent in 2015, 90 percent in the United Kingdom and 67 percent in the U.S. between 1995 and 2011. Some put the rate even higher in the United States, but it is difficult to determine the exact number because the U.S. government does not keep detailed statistics about abortion.