Alabama Democrat Senate Candidate Doug Jones: Rights for an Unborn Baby Don’t Begin Until Birth

State   Mallory Quigley   Sep 28, 2017   |   6:42PM    Washington, DC

This afternoon Susan B. Anthony List president Marjorie Dannenfelser slammed Alabama Democratic Senate candidate Doug Jones for saying he opposes any and all abortion limits, even a common ground ban on abortion after five months, a point by which research shows the unborn child can feel pain.

In an interview on NBC Wednesday, Jones emphasized his support for abortion without restrictions and said: “I want to make sure people understand that once a baby is born, I’m going to be there for that child, that’s where I become a right-to-lifer.”

“Doug Jones clearly has no problem with the fact that the U.S. is only one of seven nations – alongside North Korea and China – to allow elective abortion on-demand after five months. His extremism puts him dramatically out of step with Alabama voters,” said SBA List President Marjorie Dannenfelser. “Alabama is one of twenty states to take a stand against the brutality of late term abortions having approved a state limit in 2011. Polls consistently show that a large majority of Americans – women in higher numbers than men – support bringing our national laws into line with basic human decency and the House will vote on this measure next week. Jones is out to impress the big abortion lobby but this does nothing for his chances against Judge Moore.”

Nationwide polling by the polling company, inc./WomanTrend, Quinnipiac, National Journal, Huffington Post, NBC/Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post/ABC News has found that a plurality or majority of Americans support limiting abortion after five months, women in higher numbers than men.

President Donald Trump has made four key commitments to the pro-life movement, including signing the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act – SBA List’s top legislative priority – into law.

Jones and Republican candidate Judge Roy Moore will face off in a special election on December 12 to fill the senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.