Martin Luther King Jr’s Niece Alveda King: Abortion is Racism and Takes Away the Civil Rights of Unborn Babies

National   Steven Ertelt   Aug 14, 2017   |   4:40PM    Washington, DC

Alveda King the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King jr is responding today to the white supremacy protests in Charlottesville, Virginia.

King says the white supremacists definitely need to be condemned and that racism is a sin and a blight on society. But the niece of the slain civil rights leader says she believes that abortion is also racism because it denies civil rights to unborn children.

King told LifeNews:

As we see from the most recent racially motivated massacre in Virginia, racism is still alive and raising hell. Think about it. Racism is sin. Hatred is sin. Yet for whatever reason, the pot of domestic terrorism continues to be stirred under the guise of promoting “racial supremacy.”

The big lie is that we are separate races, when in fact the spiritual, scientific and biological fact is that we are one blood; one human race. Racism and hatred are deadly. This is why I so often quote my Uncle MLK: “We must learn to live together as brothers [and sisters], or perish together as fools. I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.”

We should be grateful that President Trump is calling for a ceasefire on the violence. My King Family Legacy foundations have taught me that nonviolent conflict reconciliation is the key to ending these “race wars.”

But King also said abortion is racism — a message she admits some people don’t want to hear.

As one of God’s microphones, I’m often required to say what people don’t want to hear. Abortion is racism, in that abortion takes away the civil rights and lives of our weakest and most vulnerable members of the human race, unborn babies.

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For both forms of racism, King called for nonviolent responses.

“Nonviolence is not passive, but requires courage. Nonviolence seeks reconciliation, not defeat of an adversary. Nonviolent action is directed at eliminating evil, not destroying an evildoer,” King said, calling for a “willingness to accept suffering for the cause, if necessary, but never to inflict it” and “rejection of hatred, animosity or violence of the spirit, as well as refusal to commit.”