Pro-Abortion Hillary Clinton Considering Becoming a Methodist Pastor

National   Steven Ertelt   Aug 9, 2017   |   10:19AM    Washington, DC

So what do you do if you are an abortion advocate who lost two presidential elections in a row? For Hillary Clinton it is considering becoming a Methodist pastor.

The news that Clinton would consider becoming a pastor in the United Methodist Church is not surprising given that the Methodist Church supported abortion for years until recently and still has a large contingent of pastors and other church leaders who strongly support abortion.

Here’s more:

According to The Atlantic, Clinton told her longtime pastor Bill Shillady, at a recent photo shoot for his new book, that she wants to preach — something that the outlet says has always been a dream for her.

This comes on the back of a report that Clinton told an editor in 1994 that she thought “all the time” about becoming a minister. Per the Atlantic:

Last fall, the former Newsweek editor Kenneth Woodward revealed that Clinton told him in 1994 that she thought “all the time” about becoming an ordained Methodist minister. She asked him not to write about it, though: “It will make me seem much too pious.” The incident perfectly captures Clinton’s long campaign to modulate—and sometimes obscure—expressions of her faith.

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The revelation comes ahead of two Clinton-related books coming out in 2017. Clinton herself has written What Happened — a 500+ page campaign post-mortem about how she lost in November. But Shillady himself has a new book of devotions: “Strong for a Moment Like This: The Daily Devotions of Hillary Rodham Clinton” which has a forward by Clinton herself.

Hillary Clinton says she is a Christian and a United Methodist; however, her radical positions on abortion, religious freedom and other issues have many questioning the sincerity of her religious beliefs.

Meanwhile, in a strange comment a couple years back, Chelsea Clinton said she left the Baptist Church at the age of 6 because it has a strongly pro-life position opposing abortions.

Clinton made the comment at a recent fundraiser for Hillary Clinton in an attempt to address evangelicals who question her mother’s faith in God. She said she was upset when teachers in a Sunday School class talked about the wrongness of abortion.

“I find it quite insulting sometimes when people say to my mom, my dad or me . . . that they question our faith,’ said Chelsea. “I was raised in a Methodist church and I left the Baptist church before my dad did, because I didn’t know why they were talking to me about abortion when I was 6 in Sunday school — that’s a true story.”

“My mother is very deeply a person of faith,” Chelsea said. “It is deeply authentic and real for my mother, and it guides so much of her moral compass, but also her life’s work.”

“I recognized that there were many expressions of faith that I don’t agree with and feel [are] quite antithetical to how I read the Bible,” Chelsea said. “But I find it really challenging when people who are self-professed liberals kind of look askance at my family’s history.”