New Movie Will Praise Racist Planned Parenthood Founder Margaret Sanger as an “Icon and Hero”

National   Erin Parfet   Dec 16, 2016   |   11:27AM    Washington, DC

Despite founding an organization that has become the nation’s biggest abortion business, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger is being exalted by Hollywood as “an icon and hero,” Deadline reports.

Ellen Feldman’s book, Terrible Virtue, which is about Sanger’s life, is being turned into a film to highlight various aspects of Sanger’s work. Producing the film is Justine Ciarrocchi, a production partner of popular actress Jennifer Lawrence, and directing it is well-known actor and director Ron Howard, according to the report.

As Deadline reports:

Published by HarperCollins in March, Terrible Virtue focuses on Sanger as the daughter of a hard-drinking, smooth-tongued free thinker and mother worn down by 13 children, who vowed her life would be different. Following Sanger’s training as a nurse, her work alongside labor organizers, anarchists, socialists and other progressives and eventually her devotion to the cause of legalizing contraception, the film examines the risks she took and the impact she had that lasts to the present day.

“Margaret’s story as an advocate who led the battle for birth control and eventually founding Planned Parenthood is so relevant given our recent election and today’s climate as we are once again forced to deal with basic human rights,” Erika Olde, an assistant film producer, told Deadline. “I share a mutual passion of the subject with Justine and look forward to bringing this topic and heroic individual to the forefront.”

But abortion is not a “basic human rights” issue when it strips the most fundamental human right, life, to those who cannot speak for themselves. Today, Planned Parenthood has become the No. 1 abortion provider in the United States, stripping more than 320,000 unborn babies their right to life every year.

Margaret Sanger’s mother died from tuberculosis when she was 19, and Sanger believed the stress on her mother’s body from birthing children weakened her, leading to disease and ultimately death, according to the National Women’s History Museum. This propelled Sanger into a nursing career. While practicing in New York City, she observed many patients, often poorer immigrants, suffering complications of abortions gone wrong, as well as the financial and sometimes physical toll of multiple pregnancies. This led her to conclude limiting family size may help these women overcome poverty. Sanger was arrested after opening the country’s first birth control clinic in 1916. She continued to vocally advocate for birth control and contraception, and was active in the eugenics movement throughout the rest of her life.

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Speeches, outreach, and public speaking events over the next two decades including at eugenics conferences focused on contraception and medical interventions to pregnancy. Though Sanger did not advocate for abortion at the time, she pushed for other de-humanizing practices, including sterilization of the mentally ill.

“… Their lives are hopeless repetitions. All that they have said has been said before; all that they have done has been done better before. Such human weeds clog up the path, drain up the energies and the resources of this little earth. We must clear the way for a better world; we must cultivate our garden,” Sanger wrote in 1925.

Control, not choice, was Sanger’s key word when it came to matters of reproduction, said Angela Franks, Ph.D., an expert on Sanger who has written several books about her life. Franks said Sanger believed that some of the “unfit” should be forced to not reproduce.

Sanger wrote in “The Pivot of Civilization” that the government should “attempt to restrain, either by force or by persuasion, the moron and the imbecile from producing his large family of feeble-minded offspring.”

Sanger supported the U.S. government when it began coerced and forced sterilization programs – a black mark on our nation’s history, Franks said. Sanger even suggested that the government offer “bonus or yearly pension to all obviously unfit parents who allow themselves to be sterilized” – a form of coercion, Franks pointed out.

“You’re offering them a year’s salary to be sterilized? That’s coercion,” Franks said.

Hollywood is glorifying and exalting someone who believed that not all human beings are created equal, and potentially raking in millions of dollars for projecting on television screens nationwide the message that such behavior and mentalities are moral, right and laudatory.

As Vice President-elect Mike Pence said in the final debate, “Society will be judged by how it defends its most vulnerable – the aged, the infirm, the disabled, and the unborn.” How true.

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